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August Caregiver Education at ACE

August 20162

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Dementia Lunch and Learn

Caregiver Resource Panel1

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Women’s Equality Day Breakfast

Women's Breakfast Flyer (final)

Don’t Get Ripped Off By AC Repairs

This message brought to you on behalf of North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper.
Soaring temperatures mean air conditioners are working overtime. If your AC goes out, it may be tempting to get it fixed as quickly as possible, no matter the cost. But try to keep your cool and do your homework before hiring someone to fix your air conditioning.

Each year, dozens of consumers contact our office to complain about problems with air conditioning and heating repairs. To avoid problems:

  • Get recommendations. Ask friends, neighbors and co-workers who they use for repairs.
  • Check credentials. Contact the Consumer Protection Division at 1-877-5-NO-SCAM and your local Better Business Bureau to learn about the company’s complaint history. To see if the repair person is properly licensed, contact the State Board of Examiners of Plumbing, Heating and Fire Sprinkler Contractors at (919) 875-3612.
  • Get a written contract. Read it carefully before you sign it and make sure it includes all promises made orally. Remember that state law gives you three business days to cancel if you sign a home repair contract at your home rather than at the company’s place of business.
  • Don’t pay upfront, don’t pay until you’re satisfied, and pay by check or credit card—not cash—if possible.

If you experience problems with an air conditioning repair job, call us toll-free within North Carolina at 1-877-5-NO-SCAM or file a complaint online at ncdoj.gov.

To protect yourself from higher temperatures, learn the warning signs of heat-related illness and how to contact your local Department of Social Services for help if you are without a way to cool off.

 

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Get Caffeinated and Money Smart

Coffee Talk1

Two Scams in One – Phony Tech Support and Overpayment

This message brought to you on behalf of North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper.

For years, crooks have charged victims to repair nonexistent problems on their computers in order to gain access to sensitive personal and financial information stored inside. Now they’ve added a new scam: trying to talk you into long-term technical support that is actually just an excuse to swindle you out of as much as $10,000.

It starts when you agree to charge the tech support membership to your credit card. The scammers call back a few days later to say the company is closing and needs your bank account information so they can to refund money directly into your checking account. To get the so-called refund, they take a large cash advance from your own credit card and deposit it into your account. Next, the con artists claim that they’ve accidentally overpaid you by thousands of dollars and need you to wire the extra funds back to them, usually in China, India or the Philippines.

These greedy crooks have been known to take out another credit card advance, put those funds into the victim’s account, and then claim that the first wire transfer didn’t go through. Victims have been convinced this way to send multiple wire transfers to the scammers. One elderly North Carolina woman ran up $10,000 in credit card debt when she fell for this scam.

Remember:

  • Avoid tech support scams. You can learn more about phony tech support from Microsoft and the FTC.
  • Be very skeptical if anyone asks you to wire money overseas. Once you’ve wired money it’s nearly impossible to get it back.
  • If you receive one of these calls, report it to the Attorney General’s Office at 1-877-5-NO-SCAM or online at www.ncdoj.gov.
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Move Into Your Happy Place

Moving Mediation1